Paid Surveys


This site offers surveys for money, paying out cash rather than points and allowing immediate rewards. Crowdology is a pretty popular website with a decent reputation which works with big brands and television shows, so can have some interesting content to keep you interested while you’re filling in forms. You could be answering questions about everyday topics or issues, such as saving money or online shopping, as well as your opinions about various products.
You're unlikely to "get rich quick" by taking paid online surveys. You will, however, likely earn or win some extra spending money, or free or discounted goods or services. Doing paid online surveys can be seen as a way to get a fairly steady flow of a decent amount of cash coming in each month. If you enjoy participating in online surveys (especially if you enjoy sharing your opinion for prizes, coupons, and other more typical non-monetary earnings), then paid online surveys is a good choice for you.
Opinion Outpost is one I have been doing for the last 7 years (SEVEN! I had to look back through to see how long it was) I have made 260 dollars in that time (roughly 37 dollars a year). I like them because I seem to qualify for a lot of them, (I think I have made a lot of that money this last year) you can cash out at every ten dollars (into your paypal account) the pitfalls they send quite a few emails between 1-5 a day and if you don’t qualify you only get a sweeps entry and in 7 years I have never won anything. it just seems so easy to cash out .
You can expect to earn $2-$5 for most of the surveys in general. For some special surveys you can earn up to $50 per survey but those are rare. Harris Poll also conducts paid focus group studies where you can earn $50-$100 per study. Usually these focus group studies are 1-2 hours long where you interact with other participants under a supervision of a focus group moderator.
First, thank you for providing this extensive list. I wanted to offer a quick follow up. After reading your post I decided to give Survey Junkie a try and I’ve already closed the account. Yes, I can tell it’s well organized and it is definitely a user-friendly platform. The problems I experienced were first that not one of the surveys they emailed me about were available. I did, however, complete several surveys from the site itself and I found them to be lengthy – in itself, not a problem but 3 out of 5 told me I didn’t qualify after I’d already invested 10 – 12 minutes filling out the forms. They got more than enough information from me to be useful which is an old and highly unethical trick in market research – which happens to be my background. All in all a LOT of wasted time.
Surveys can be super quick and take just a few minutes to fill out, or require around 15 minutes of your time. Five minute surveys pay $0.50 and surveys range from $0.40 up to the higher – and rarer – ones at $10.Paying out by the usual methods, Crowdology does PayPal and also vouchers. Most importantly, the minimum reward threshold is low so when you’ve earned $8, you can cash it out, unlike other sites which make you wait until you have earned much more money. The site offers prize draws from time to time for things like cinema tickets and surveys can be expected weekly.
I know this is kind of an older comment, but just in case you haven’t gotten it resolved yet, just email the address that they have in the email/website. They have always answered me promptly whenever I email them with a question or concern. They should be able to fix the problem for you!! I love Pinecone too; definitely worth trying to have them fix it.

There are also many questionable "middleman" third-party paid survey sites that hype easy money for participating in online marketing research from home. Here, the old adage is true: if it sounds too good to be true, it usually is. Further, it’s worth knowing that there’s a lot of competition among these companies for your participation – which means potential for exaggeration, at the very least, if not outright scams.
The concept of data mining and profiting off that data mining isn't anything new.  And while some companies engage in some rather disreputable practices to do this, Global Test Market seems to be doing just fine with the whole “consent to disclose” thing.  More importantly, in some cases this may help you as some companies will offer to do more specialized product testing once they've identified you as their target demographic.
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