Paid Surveys


Swagbucks remains popular as they are a reliable site, offering novel ways to earn rewards, including playing games and watching videos. Completing polls and surveys for money takes around 10 minutes each and can make up the bulk of your time on the site. You won’t always qualify, and getting to a late stage in a survey application process and then finding out you’re not qualified can be pretty galling. The slickly designed website is straightforward and pleasing to use and also allows you to make money on your shopping by offering a range of affiliate links. By simply clicking on the Swagbucks link and shopping at sites including Amazon, Walmart and Nike, you will earn points, as those companies are paying Swagbucks to link to them, and you get a share of their fee.
Surveys are just a small piece of the puzzle. The best part about the surveys is that the qualification questions are typically short, there to confirm you're not breezing through it, and you can still earn points if you don't qualify. You will not answer 30 questions and then get denied, with zero to show for it. As of May 2017, they've paid out $191.5 million. They give out 7,000 free gift cards every single day.
I have been using Survey Savvy for almost 2 years and for a while they were paying out pretty good for access to my e-mails and junk mail. Recently I had problems with them and some (not very bright) account manager that could never tell me if my pc was hooked up. I realized it wasn’t when no money was going to my account. I’ll stick to the $1 surveys for now. Opinion Outpost and My survey have been pretty good. I close out of the site if I am disqualified for 4 surveys in a row. But I just cashed out Opin Outpost for $60 and I am almost up to $50 on My Survey. It takes me about 2 months to earn these.
It’s a good idea to keep a record of all the paid surveys you’re doing, so you make sure you are being paid for all your efforts. Whether taking paid surveys is a full-time or part-time job, you should keep track of your progress. That way you can organise your paid surveys and never miss an opportunity to make money online from your paid survey offers.
Something unique that MyPoints offers that most other similar companies don't offer is the ability to earn cash back on some in-store purchases at select stores, along with their online paid surveys. Also, although their online store cashback rates aren't the highest in the industry (ironically, Swagbucks beats them on several offers), they do have special offers that other companies don't have, such as a bonus to sign up for Amazon Prime.

They include sites that seem to be their competitors because they earn referral fees when you buy memberships. A couple mentioned in scam forums even try to dupe you into buying the same list at other membership sites they own under different names. Naturally, these sites also have an incentive to exaggerate how much you'll earn from online paid surveys. 

First, thank you for providing this extensive list. I wanted to offer a quick follow up. After reading your post I decided to give Survey Junkie a try and I’ve already closed the account. Yes, I can tell it’s well organized and it is definitely a user-friendly platform. The problems I experienced were first that not one of the surveys they emailed me about were available. I did, however, complete several surveys from the site itself and I found them to be lengthy – in itself, not a problem but 3 out of 5 told me I didn’t qualify after I’d already invested 10 – 12 minutes filling out the forms. They got more than enough information from me to be useful which is an old and highly unethical trick in market research – which happens to be my background. All in all a LOT of wasted time.
I have a check on the way from inbox dollars. I enjoy the variety of activities you can do to earn cash. My current payout is $40 minus a few cents and I think I have been with them about 4-6 months. In fairness, I don’t do a ton of activities so I accumulate slowly. I like MyView because you get 100 points for each survey you do not qualify for after only a couple or so questions! I have not cashed out with them yet but my Dtr. Has and loves them as well. Thanks so much for the update.
Alliance Wealth Management, LLC (“Alliance”) is a registered investment adviser offering advisory services in the State(s) of Illinois and in other jurisdictions where exempted. Registration does not imply a certain level of skill or training. The presence of this website on the Internet shall not be directly or indirectly interpreted as a solicitation of investment advisory services to persons of another jurisdiction unless otherwise permitted by statute. Follow-up or individualized responses to consumers in a particular state by Alliance in the rendering of personalized investment advice for compensation shall not be made without our first complying with jurisdiction requirements or pursuant an applicable state exemption.
Post-recession, a lot of workers started looking for ways to earn extra cash. While most side gigs won’t supplant the steady cashflow of a regular job, they can pad a paycheck that hasn’t seen a significant boost in a few years. Paid surveys are often mentioned as one way to earn a few extra dollars fast. But are paid surveys a legitimate way to make money – or are they scams? The answer is that it depends on the survey and the company you are taking them for.
First, thank you for providing this extensive list. I wanted to offer a quick follow up. After reading your post I decided to give Survey Junkie a try and I’ve already closed the account. Yes, I can tell it’s well organized and it is definitely a user-friendly platform. The problems I experienced were first that not one of the surveys they emailed me about were available. I did, however, complete several surveys from the site itself and I found them to be lengthy – in itself, not a problem but 3 out of 5 told me I didn’t qualify after I’d already invested 10 – 12 minutes filling out the forms. They got more than enough information from me to be useful which is an old and highly unethical trick in market research – which happens to be my background. All in all a LOT of wasted time.
If they are going to record your face, they tell you upfront. In four years of tests, I’ve only had that request once and I declined that test. The rest of it is kind of what the point of these tests are. In order to do this, you download a screen recorder and they follow your movements. You are never asked to enter or use actual personal information. In fact, if a test asks for that, you are instructed to report it. The purpose of these tests is to see how you use the webpage or app you are testing. I have been using them for more than four years now and easily can make several hundred dollars a month vs. the $20 in 6 months other survey sites provide. If your uncomfortable, obviously, this isn’t for you. I just didn’t want someone else to miss out on a great opportunity thinking this was some kind of scam. When my family and I went to Disney in 2013, I earned $1600 in six weeks to pay for food and spending money. Usertesting.com is fantastic!

It’s a very well-known scam. You cash the check, then they ask you to either wire some of that money back to them as some sort of fee or buy something for them and send the item to them. So, you deposit the check, then wire some cash to them thinking that the check you just deposited will cover that. A few days later, after you already send them the money, the check will bounce and the money you send to them will come out of your own account.

×