Paid Surveys


Ipsos is a funny name for one of the oldest and largest global market research companies. They were founded in 1975 and if you follow US politics, you'll recognize them partnering often with Reuters to produce approval surveys of Congress, the President, and other notable figures. They're headquartered in Paris, France and publicly traded on the Paris Stock Exchange. They have revenues of over a billion dollars – Ipsos i-Say is just a small piece of their business.

When offered a grand promise for a seemingly small price, many more are likely to fall for it. Being human, the idea of paying very little for great return is incredibly enticing. This is the leading idea behind offers like “Earn $200 every day! Just $10 for access to our exclusive list of high paying surveys.”  When entering the arena of paid online surveys, it's important to be wary of any offer like this that seems too good to be true.


The biggest draw of taking online surveys is that you can take these surveys whenever it’s convenient to you. You decide when and where you take these surveys. All you need is a laptop or mobile device that can connect to the Internet. So relax and take some surveys while enjoying your favourite café or in front of the tv when the kids are asleep, it’s up to you! And best of all - you’ll get paid for it.
They include sites that seem to be their competitors because they earn referral fees when you buy memberships. A couple mentioned in scam forums even try to dupe you into buying the same list at other membership sites they own under different names. Naturally, these sites also have an incentive to exaggerate how much you'll earn from online paid surveys.
Avoiding scams online is pretty easy once you’ve become familiar with how false ads work and have developed realistic expectation about how much money you can make for the time you spend. On the surface, making money taking paid online surveys may seem like a long shot, but it certainly is possible and many people enjoy the benefits of taking part in them. So don’t be afraid! If you want to try it, read some of our reviews and sign up for the ones that look interesting to you!
Survey Junkie makes it quick and easy to jump into the survey game. According to their websites, they say they are the “most popular spot online to earn cash and rewards for sharing your thoughts,” while that might not be technically true, they are one of the largest survey sites out there. They were launched all the way back in 2005 (which is pretty old for a survey site) and they have over 4,000,000 members. 

They used to be cash-only, but in 2013 they switched over to a points system. Panelists can share their opinions in surveys and complete other various offers in exchange for points. 100 points is equal to $1, and most of their surveys pay up to $3. Survey topics are diverse and cover a variety of different topics. Pinecone Research is unique in that they emphasize consumption related surveys more than other panels.


They include sites that seem to be their competitors because they earn referral fees when you buy memberships. A couple mentioned in scam forums even try to dupe you into buying the same list at other membership sites they own under different names. Naturally, these sites also have an incentive to exaggerate how much you'll earn from online paid surveys. 

You can expect to earn $2-$5 for most of the surveys in general. For some special surveys you can earn up to $50 per survey but those are rare. Harris Poll also conducts paid focus group studies where you can earn $50-$100 per study. Usually these focus group studies are 1-2 hours long where you interact with other participants under a supervision of a focus group moderator.
If you can't find any information on other sites or forums, there are some things about the website you can check for yourself. The first thing we recommend is to look for a privacy policy. Having one on the site that is easily accessible to users is a clear sign of credibility. It shows that the company is at least making some promises as to how your information will be used. Lacking a privacy policy is a clear red flag and often signifies a scam.
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