Paid Surveys


Scammers use a diverse variety of methods to allure and dupe unsuspecting victims. Some ads and offers look so real that even the most seasoned internet veterans can be tricked. However, many scams target people new to the market who may be more susceptible to “get rich quick” schemes because they're unaware of what you can reasonably make taking surveys. It is incredibly uncommon to be offered more than $10 to complete a 20 minute survey. Not that one offering that or more is definitely a scam, it's just important to be cautious. While some experienced and well credited survey takers receive legitimate offers paying that pay big money, if you're new to survey taking you should definitely steer clear of anyone offering you hundreds to complete a survey.
Unlike some of the other sites, with Inbox Dollar, you essentially sign up to take advantage of whatever Inbox Dollar makes from their advertisers.  They will send you emails which they get paid per receipt of you reading them or clicking a link.  In turn, they give you a cut.  Not to ruin your day but it's a rather small cut.  The links that end up paying out the most usually have some stipulations attached – such as signing up for a service.  This can end up being a lot more hassle than its worth and we recommend you pay VERY close attention to the stipulations.

Post-recession, a lot of workers started looking for ways to earn extra cash. While most side gigs won’t supplant the steady cashflow of a regular job, they can pad a paycheck that hasn’t seen a significant boost in a few years. Paid surveys are often mentioned as one way to earn a few extra dollars fast. But are paid surveys a legitimate way to make money – or are they scams? The answer is that it depends on the survey and the company you are taking them for.
Pinecone Research works a lot like other paid survey sites. Once you sign up, you’ll earn points for each survey you complete. As an added bonus, the responses you give during surveys will help you learn about new products before they hit the market and influence their respective marketing campaigns. And once you start racking up the points, you can redeem them for cash or prizes.
Survey Junkie makes it quick and easy to jump into the survey game. According to their websites, they say they are the “most popular spot online to earn cash and rewards for sharing your thoughts,” while that might not be technically true, they are one of the largest survey sites out there. They were launched all the way back in 2005 (which is pretty old for a survey site) and they have over 4,000,000 members. 
If you're looking to make money by completing surveys online – this site will not be very helpful for you.  Like the previous sites, they will take, retain, and sell your information to anyone that waves a dollar in their faces.  UNLIKE previous sites reviewed, they hide their consent for that information.  It's buried.  So not only do you make silly reward points that don't translate to cash but every third party service and product solicitor has your personal information.

Illegitimate companies and scammers have a simple objective. They're after your information in order to get your money. It's much more common for internet scammers to target hundreds of people for small sums rather than a single person for thousands. This is because demanding large sums for a product that is somewhat unclear is an obvious red flag to most.
There are also many questionable "middleman" third-party paid survey sites that hype easy money for participating in online marketing research from home. Here, the old adage is true: if it sounds too good to be true, it usually is. Further, it’s worth knowing that there’s a lot of competition among these companies for your participation – which means potential for exaggeration, at the very least, if not outright scams.
As well as using your laptop, you can fill in MySurvey forms on the move by using their app available for both Apple and Android phones. This is perfect because surveys should really be about filling time, rather than dedicating particular time to them, so being able to pass time in queues or while commuting and simultaneously make money is very appealing.
Opinion Outpost is one I have been doing for the last 7 years (SEVEN! I had to look back through to see how long it was) I have made 260 dollars in that time (roughly 37 dollars a year). I like them because I seem to qualify for a lot of them, (I think I have made a lot of that money this last year) you can cash out at every ten dollars (into your paypal account) the pitfalls they send quite a few emails between 1-5 a day and if you don’t qualify you only get a sweeps entry and in 7 years I have never won anything. it just seems so easy to cash out .

Something unique that MyPoints offers that most other similar companies don't offer is the ability to earn cash back on some in-store purchases at select stores, along with their online paid surveys. Also, although their online store cashback rates aren't the highest in the industry (ironically, Swagbucks beats them on several offers), they do have special offers that other companies don't have, such as a bonus to sign up for Amazon Prime.
Interesting read, thanks for sharing. I suppose that online surveys may generate a few extra dollars on the side for some people, but it does require you to qualify for certain surveys online. In many cases you may not qualify, and will result in having to search for more surveys. This can be time consuming and in most cases not as profitable as may be expected.

If you're looking to make money by completing surveys online – this site will not be very helpful for you.  Like the previous sites, they will take, retain, and sell your information to anyone that waves a dollar in their faces.  UNLIKE previous sites reviewed, they hide their consent for that information.  It's buried.  So not only do you make silly reward points that don't translate to cash but every third party service and product solicitor has your personal information.


They used to be cash-only, but in 2013 they switched over to a points system. Panelists can share their opinions in surveys and complete other various offers in exchange for points. 100 points is equal to $1, and most of their surveys pay up to $3. Survey topics are diverse and cover a variety of different topics. Pinecone Research is unique in that they emphasize consumption related surveys more than other panels.
They claim to also offer paid product testing opportunities. But it’s not really paid product testing, but more of getting cash back. Basically, besides surveys, you can purchase products and services through their portal and earn a certain amount of cash back for every dollar you spend. If you were going to buy something already, it’s a great way to get some of the cash back. But don’t just buy something because of the cashback.
It’s never a good idea to write false information on your paid survey account or sign up for paid surveys that don’t match your characteristics. For example, if a paid survey is looking for a NASA aerospace engineer who is also a competitive food eater and has won the tour de France twice it isn’t a smart idea to claim to match those parameter (unless you really do). Paid survey companies often share information and if you have taken paid surveys for another company under the pretenses that you are a newly graduated software developer in Brighton, chances are that they will notice the discrepancies and you might be penalised for it. There have been a few cases of people having their paid survey account banned and all their hard earned money revoked for providing false information on a paid survey. It’s also not a good idea to register two email accounts for taking paid surveys because many paid survey panels frown upon this sort of behavior and may even ban you from taking their paid surveys.
One nice feature is the ability to shop through Vindale, as they often have offers available through affiliate links. Before buying something new, like an appliance, it is worth signing into their easy to use website and checking if you can get it for less through Vindale. There’s also a popular daily consumer survey paying $1.50 which you can complete every day, for an easy and reliable boost.
It’s a very well-known scam. You cash the check, then they ask you to either wire some of that money back to them as some sort of fee or buy something for them and send the item to them. So, you deposit the check, then wire some cash to them thinking that the check you just deposited will cover that. A few days later, after you already send them the money, the check will bounce and the money you send to them will come out of your own account.
Ipsos is a funny name for one of the oldest and largest global market research companies. They were founded in 1975 and if you follow US politics, you'll recognize them partnering often with Reuters to produce approval surveys of Congress, the President, and other notable figures. They're headquartered in Paris, France and publicly traded on the Paris Stock Exchange. They have revenues of over a billion dollars – Ipsos i-Say is just a small piece of their business.
A few paid survey sites do pay relatively well in cash. However, many sites hype hypothetical, best-case scenarios that can't possibly apply to each and every consumer for each and every hour of participation. In the real world, the likelihood that you'll often earn the higher of the hyped amounts is slim. Most online paid surveys simply don't pay much, and you must be invited to complete them. To be invited, you must fit targeted demographics. That alone limits your earnings right off the bat, as you can't possibly fit every demographic.
Survey Club has been offering online paid surveys since 2005, and in the fast paced every changing world of the web that’s a reassuringly long amount of time. They are a bit of an acquired taste, in that they specialise in long, detailed surveys for high end clients rather than the quick and cheerful consumer surveys that you may be more familiar with. Whilst this does mean that you may have to commit a bit more time, it does mean that if you have the patience to persevere with them they pay more money than most survey and reward sites. They also offer local taste tests (see what I said about ‘an acquired taste’?), and secret shopper opportunities.

That’s a really old and huge presence in research industry that has partnered with many of what are listed in this very list. So Signing up on ClixSense, you can also take paid survey invitations from multiple survey sites and research firms, like Opinion Outpost, Nielson Media Research, YouGov, I-Poll, MySurvey, Toluna and more, almost half of all those survey sites being listed here.


One Poll is a company that was founded in the United Kingdom, but it’s also open to consumers in the United States and beyond. It claims to be recognized by Money Saving Expert, one of the largest consumer websites in that country, which is a reassuring recommendation. What I recognized about it is that the surveys are short and easy to complete, so ideal if you’ve had a hard day and don’t want to do anything too taxing. New surveys are added on a daily basis, and some are amusingly quirky.
IOCS is a not-for-profit research organization that conducts studies and experiments on shopping-related behavior – things like how we, as consumers, evaluate products, how we make the buying decisions, etc. Although the focus is mostly on shopping related behavior, some of their experiments and studies include broader areas of marketing, psychology, and economics.
The other type of paid surveys CashCrate features are targeted surveys, which are available only to you and people who meet your demographic profile. It's very important that you fill out your profile on CashCrate right when you sign-up. Not only will you earn $.50 instantly, you'll also be eligible to receive these special surveys. So why are they so great? First, they'll often pay more than Daily Surveys. That means when you see one available, you should jump on it right away.
MySurvey is actually and adaptation of a program that was started back in 1946. It began as the National Family Opinion organization that used to send out surveys through the mail. In 2001, they joined the digital age, and now they are one of the best survey sites around. According to the website, they have issued out more than $15,000,000 rewards to members.
In the middle of all of this is a new breed of research corporation that relies on you – the survey taker – to determine this information.  For your time?  Many survey companies will pay you to take surveys for money or for other cash alternatives like gift cards or physical prizes and rewards. It depends upon the company as to whether they'll offer money or other offers and special deals.
Scammers use a diverse variety of methods to allure and dupe unsuspecting victims. Some ads and offers look so real that even the most seasoned internet veterans can be tricked. However, many scams target people new to the market who may be more susceptible to “get rich quick” schemes because they're unaware of what you can reasonably make taking surveys. It is incredibly uncommon to be offered more than $10 to complete a 20 minute survey. Not that one offering that or more is definitely a scam, it's just important to be cautious. While some experienced and well credited survey takers receive legitimate offers paying that pay big money, if you're new to survey taking you should definitely steer clear of anyone offering you hundreds to complete a survey.
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