Paid Surveys


A few paid survey sites do pay relatively well in cash. However, many sites hype hypothetical, best-case scenarios that can't possibly apply to each and every consumer for each and every hour of participation. In the real world, the likelihood that you'll often earn the higher of the hyped amounts is slim. Most online paid surveys simply don't pay much, and you must be invited to complete them. To be invited, you must fit targeted demographics. That alone limits your earnings right off the bat, as you can't possibly fit every demographic.
They claim to also offer paid product testing opportunities. But it’s not really paid product testing, but more of getting cash back. Basically, besides surveys, you can purchase products and services through their portal and earn a certain amount of cash back for every dollar you spend. If you were going to buy something already, it’s a great way to get some of the cash back. But don’t just buy something because of the cashback.

You won't get rich doing these things but it's legitimate and you'll get paid in the end. For example, you get a penny for each email you click. You get a penny for a video stream. You can earn dollars for fulfilling offers but those aren't nearly as quick as reading an email. They are upfront in what you get paid so you can decide if it's worth it.
Paid survey site companies invest billions of dollars into marketing research online.  They always want to find out more intricate details of a consumer's relationship with their product.  Whether it's a new television show or just an existing product line, companies like Disney, Samsung, and Sony go to great lengths to find out their ideal audiences.

One of the most popular sites, and rightfully so, Swagbucks offers traditional surveys as well as a range of additional ways to make cash. Filling out surveys for money will reward you with points called Swagbucks which can be cashed out through PayPal, or redeemed as gift cards for shops including Amazon.com. As a sweetener, they’ll even give you $5 just for signing up.
Everyone has an opinion, well now Opinion Plus will convert your opinion into cash in your pocket thanks to its intuitive and easy to use paid survey site. It scores highly because the surveys are tailored to each individual user, and yet they still send regular invites so you won’t be waiting around for something to do or, even worse, filling in surveys that you aren’t eligible for and won’t get paid for. They send payments via PayPal only, but their payout rate is among the best that we’ve seen.
Some pay with points that are redeemable for cash or goods and typically you must rack up a bunch to redeem them for anything of significance. Others may give you a gift card, discount, or another token of appreciation for participating. Many others pay nothing or only offer sweepstakes entries for completing screening surveys to determine your eligibility for other, paid surveys. A few don't pay much of anything, unless you recruit others, as in a pyramid scheme.
This site offers surveys for money, paying out cash rather than points and allowing immediate rewards. Crowdology is a pretty popular website with a decent reputation which works with big brands and television shows, so can have some interesting content to keep you interested while you’re filling in forms. You could be answering questions about everyday topics or issues, such as saving money or online shopping, as well as your opinions about various products.
It’s a common mistake for many people who are new to paid surveys to sign up for a paid survey panel and then forget to check their email for responses. It is important to check your email each day for paid survey offers because surveys stop accepting more people once they have reached their limit. If you miss a paid survey then you miss the opportunity to make money online, and that is never nice. To avoid missing any paid survey offers it is a good idea to set email notifications to directly forward to your mobile phone. That way you will get an SMS or similar alert every time you receive a paid survey offer. Moreover, the more consistent you are with taking paid surveys, the more you will be offered and the more money you can earn. They key is to check your email often so you can respond immediately for new paid survey offers.
They don’t give a reason for this, but I assume it has to do with taxes. You see, if you pay someone $600 in any given year, you are required by law to report that earning and send them a tax form at the end of the year. And since 60,000 equals to $600, I assume they have that rule in place so they don’t have to deal with all that paperwork come tax time.

If they are going to record your face, they tell you upfront. In four years of tests, I’ve only had that request once and I declined that test. The rest of it is kind of what the point of these tests are. In order to do this, you download a screen recorder and they follow your movements. You are never asked to enter or use actual personal information. In fact, if a test asks for that, you are instructed to report it. The purpose of these tests is to see how you use the webpage or app you are testing. I have been using them for more than four years now and easily can make several hundred dollars a month vs. the $20 in 6 months other survey sites provide. If your uncomfortable, obviously, this isn’t for you. I just didn’t want someone else to miss out on a great opportunity thinking this was some kind of scam. When my family and I went to Disney in 2013, I earned $1600 in six weeks to pay for food and spending money. Usertesting.com is fantastic!
If you're looking to make money by completing surveys online – this site will not be very helpful for you.  Like the previous sites, they will take, retain, and sell your information to anyone that waves a dollar in their faces.  UNLIKE previous sites reviewed, they hide their consent for that information.  It's buried.  So not only do you make silly reward points that don't translate to cash but every third party service and product solicitor has your personal information.

Scammers use a diverse variety of methods to allure and dupe unsuspecting victims. Some ads and offers look so real that even the most seasoned internet veterans can be tricked. However, many scams target people new to the market who may be more susceptible to “get rich quick” schemes because they're unaware of what you can reasonably make taking surveys. It is incredibly uncommon to be offered more than $10 to complete a 20 minute survey. Not that one offering that or more is definitely a scam, it's just important to be cautious. While some experienced and well credited survey takers receive legitimate offers paying that pay big money, if you're new to survey taking you should definitely steer clear of anyone offering you hundreds to complete a survey.
One of the great things about Survey Savvy is that they really do offer a great variety of surveys to choose from, so you won’t simply be talking about the consumer goods that you buy on a day to day basis. They have surveys on topical issues and about politics in general, but don’t worry you don’t have to be a political animal to be able to complete the survey – you just need to have an opinion. Another thing I really appreciated about survey savvy is that their surveys are short and snappy, and you can complete them within ten minutes or even less. That means you can quickly earn the points that can then be exchanged into folding cash.
Something unique that MyPoints offers that most other similar companies don't offer is the ability to earn cash back on some in-store purchases at select stores, along with their online paid surveys. Also, although their online store cashback rates aren't the highest in the industry (ironically, Swagbucks beats them on several offers), they do have special offers that other companies don't have, such as a bonus to sign up for Amazon Prime.
It’s easy to earn cash for surveys. How much you get paid completely depends on how many paid surveys you attempt and complete. Each online survey has a different payout, with some offering as much as $50. Most will pay less, but also take less time. Expect to earn about 40 to 200 SB points per survey (100 SB = $1), with occasional opportunities with much higher earning potential.
The concept of data mining and profiting off that data mining isn't anything new.  And while some companies engage in some rather disreputable practices to do this, Global Test Market seems to be doing just fine with the whole “consent to disclose” thing.  More importantly, in some cases this may help you as some companies will offer to do more specialized product testing once they've identified you as their target demographic.

First, thank you for providing this extensive list. I wanted to offer a quick follow up. After reading your post I decided to give Survey Junkie a try and I’ve already closed the account. Yes, I can tell it’s well organized and it is definitely a user-friendly platform. The problems I experienced were first that not one of the surveys they emailed me about were available. I did, however, complete several surveys from the site itself and I found them to be lengthy – in itself, not a problem but 3 out of 5 told me I didn’t qualify after I’d already invested 10 – 12 minutes filling out the forms. They got more than enough information from me to be useful which is an old and highly unethical trick in market research – which happens to be my background. All in all a LOT of wasted time.
You can expect to earn $2-$5 for most of the surveys in general. For some special surveys you can earn up to $50 per survey but those are rare. Harris Poll also conducts paid focus group studies where you can earn $50-$100 per study. Usually these focus group studies are 1-2 hours long where you interact with other participants under a supervision of a focus group moderator.

IOCS is a not-for-profit research organization that conducts studies and experiments on shopping-related behavior – things like how we, as consumers, evaluate products, how we make the buying decisions, etc. Although the focus is mostly on shopping related behavior, some of their experiments and studies include broader areas of marketing, psychology, and economics.
×