Paid Surveys


Watching video ads: Video ads certainly aren't uncommon in the online world. While generally they're a hassle getting in the way of the content you want to watch, many paid survey sites have turned them into a way for members to make money. It's pretty easy to make a tab, set a playlist of paid ads going, mute it, and carry on with browsing the internet or taking surveys.

Like American Consumer Opinion, Harris Poll Online offers cash incentives to people who are willing to log in regularly and complete online surveys and questionnaires. Once you join, you’ll begin earning rewards for each survey you take. Once you earn enough reward “points”, you can turn them in for purchases made on websites like Amazon, iTunes, Home Depot and Walmart. Conversely, you can also turn in your points for movies, books, and home goods ordered straight from the Harris Poll website. Plus, you’ll be entered into a $10,000 sweepstakes each time you complete a survey.

They used to be cash-only, but in 2013 they switched over to a points system. Panelists can share their opinions in surveys and complete other various offers in exchange for points. 100 points is equal to $1, and most of their surveys pay up to $3. Survey topics are diverse and cover a variety of different topics. Pinecone Research is unique in that they emphasize consumption related surveys more than other panels. 

Mainly conducting polls for governments, public bodies and the business world, Opinion Outpost is a popular survey site as unlike some sites, which require you to accrue a significant amount before you can claim your money, it has one of the lowest payout thresholds. You only need to fill out five surveys, earning a couple of dollars, before being able to claim pay, so you can redeem your money more quickly.
CashCrate gives you the opportunity to make extra money by watching advertising videos and you can win prizes by playing games and contest on the site. A particularly good feature is its generous referral program, which is head and shoulders above much of the industry. If you refer your friend, you’ll get 20 percent of their earnings! If that referred friend refers someone else, you will also earn another 10 percent of what that person earns. It’s in your interest then to sign up, sign your friends up and get them to work to make you some extra money from surveys.
Opinion Outpost is one I have been doing for the last 7 years (SEVEN! I had to look back through to see how long it was) I have made 260 dollars in that time (roughly 37 dollars a year). I like them because I seem to qualify for a lot of them, (I think I have made a lot of that money this last year) you can cash out at every ten dollars (into your paypal account) the pitfalls they send quite a few emails between 1-5 a day and if you don’t qualify you only get a sweeps entry and in 7 years I have never won anything. it just seems so easy to cash out .

Return on Time: 3.5/5.0- Their payrate isn’t overwhelming- the average per hour hovers around $3. Depending on the user’s activity on the website, it can take anywhere from a couple of days to as long as a month just to earn CashCrate’s cash-out amount of $20. You certainly won’t be making top-dollar with this site, but despite their low pay they do pay their members consistently.


Scammers use a diverse variety of methods to allure and dupe unsuspecting victims. Some ads and offers look so real that even the most seasoned internet veterans can be tricked. However, many scams target people new to the market who may be more susceptible to “get rich quick” schemes because they're unaware of what you can reasonably make taking surveys. It is incredibly uncommon to be offered more than $10 to complete a 20 minute survey. Not that one offering that or more is definitely a scam, it's just important to be cautious. While some experienced and well credited survey takers receive legitimate offers paying that pay big money, if you're new to survey taking you should definitely steer clear of anyone offering you hundreds to complete a survey.

IOCS is a not-for-profit research organization that conducts studies and experiments on shopping-related behavior – things like how we, as consumers, evaluate products, how we make the buying decisions, etc. Although the focus is mostly on shopping related behavior, some of their experiments and studies include broader areas of marketing, psychology, and economics.
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